Mung Bean Pasta

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I have been trying to use my cookbooks more often. My effort has paid off with a lot of new knowledge about ingredients and some great go-to recipes that I never knew I always had, sitting right there on the bookcase in my kitchen. One thing that I was surprised to learn was how healthy mung beans are for you. Featured in my new favorite recipe for Pad Thai from Terry Walters’ Clean Food cookbook, mung bean sprouts are surprisingly nutritious. So when I saw Mung Bean Fettuccine in the grocery store, I had to give it a try.

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The package boasts an extremely high protein and fiber content as well as a high iron content, and states that the pasta is a great gluten-free alternative to wheat pasta. I am not gluten-free. In fact I think gluten is one of my favorite foods, however I am always looking for tasty protein sources so I had to check it out. Mung beans, which are low in cholesterol and high in soluble dietary fibers, can also help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol.

Until recently, mung beans had only entered our household to fill Kyle’s iron palm training bag for Wing Chun (Kung Fu), so it was a pretty big deal to start tossing mung bean sprouts in salads and stir-fry dishes. Experimenting with the fresh, crunchy sprouts was fun, but those beady green beans were a little scary, so it took us awhile to take the next step. Opening this bag of wavy green noodles was intimidating, but we were willing to give it a go in the name of science.

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After cooking and rinsing the noodles, I tasted them plain, and they weren’t too bad. I have to be honest though, they do taste a little… grassy? Because they are naturally chewier than regular pasta, it was pretty easy to get them al dente. However, I thought they really needed some flavor (besides “health food” flavor), so I mixed them with sauteed asparagus and baby bok choy, a soy dressing, and toasted sesame seeds. A drizzle of chili sauce made the meal complete.

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I thought this salad would work well either hot or cold, but I definitely preferred it hot. The noodles were so chewy after being chilled that I had a hard time getting through half of a serving before feeling full. I guess that could be a good thing? It felt weird to me, so I reheated them with a few minutes in the microwave and a generous portion of sambal. Kyle enjoyed the dish both hot and cold, so I guess you will have to decide for yourself!

The flavor combination was very fresh and springy, and versatile enough to work with any type of grain, so I recommend that you try it out even if you substitute a different kind of pasta or rice for the mung bean fettuccine. We are now firmly in the spring season, so break out that bright green asparagus and your favorite set of chopsticks and chow down!

Sesame Mung Bean Fettuccine with Spring Vegetables

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Ingredients:

  • 7 oz. dry mung bean fettuccine
  • 3 Tbsp sesame oil, divided (2+1)
  • 1 bunch asparagus
  • 2 baby bok choy
  • 4 green onions
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup liquid aminos or low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp chili sauce (sriracha or similar)
  • 2 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds

Preparation:

  1. Cook pasta according to package directions, rinse and set aside.
  2. Chop asparagus into 1-inch pieces and roughly chop baby bok choy, discarding the ends. Thinly slice the green onions.
  3. Heat 2 Tbsp sesame oil over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook for 1 minute. Add bok choy and asparagus and saute until tender and bright green, about 3 minutes.
  4. To the vegetables, add garlic and saute for another minute.
  5. In a small bowl, combine the liquid aminos (or soy sauce), brown sugar, rice wine vinegar, 1 Tbsp sesame oil, and chili sauce.
  6. Add pasta and sauce to the pan with the vegetables and stir to combine. Cook until heated throughout. Add toasted sesame seeds and serve while hot.

Ten Recipes So Easy That You Could Make Them with One Hand Tied Behind Your Back

The sun is finally out, spring is in the air, and here in Richmond, most of us are enjoying the opportunity to be outside before the thermostat goes from reading “warm” to “do-we-live-in-a-brick-oven?” We’re spending more time out reading on the patio, meeting friends for happy hour, or squeezing in a trail run or bike ride after work and before dinner. We’re not spending much time in the kitchen preparing meals. Sound familiar? If so, you may be looking for some quick and easy recipes this spring.

Ever since I flew off a bike five months ago and fractured both hands, I have had limited or no use of my left hand, which had the more severe injury. After my first surgery, I had no use of either arm for several weeks, so cooking meals, no matter how quick or easy, was out of the question. After some rehabilitation, I was able to use both hands but my left wrist fatigued easily so I had to keep things simple in the kitchen. I also had to stop writing outside of my day job because typing all day at work was all I could handle. That is why things have been pretty quiet around here lately.

Three weeks ago, I had my second surgery and a second medical leave, which left me with some time for reflection. I decided that I wanted to start writing and cooking sooner this time. I committed to the struggle, knowing that a lot of utensils would be dropped and a lot of joints would get swollen in the process. In the kitchen, I focused on dishes I could make with one hand. I still had a lot of help from my husband Kyle, but I was surprised to find how much I could do myself one handed.

Of course these recipes go even quicker with both hands, but if you’re in a cast like I was, you can pull them off pretty easily with just one. If you are fortunate enough to have the use of both hands, but you’re just in a rush and want something quick and easy, you’ll love these recipes too!

Tips for One Handed Cooking

  1. Get an electric can opener, or a friend who will open several cans at once and dump contents into easy-open reusable containers for you to pull from the refrigerator throughout the week.
  2. Buy pre-chopped vegetables. These are a lifesaver.
  3. Choose meals with few ingredients and uncomplicated preparations so that you will not have to juggle too much at once.
  4. Cook in large batches so that you can have leftovers for other meals and save yourself cooking time.
  5. Replace your salt and pepper mills with plain old pre-ground sea salt and black pepper.
  6. On the stovetop, use heavy bottomed pans that will stay in place while you stir, without someone holding on to the handles.
  7. Be patient! Focus on what you CAN do and don’t dwell on what you CANNOT do (I’m still working on that one myself.)

Easy Recipe Roundup

Eating Bird Food Green Elvis Smoothie – smoothies are a great way to boost nutrition in a quick and easy way

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Lazy Egg and Cheese Sandwich from Smitten Kitchen via A Cup of Jo. Confession: I have had so many egg sandwiches in the last few months. Try adding some Everything Bagel Sprinkles.

Vegology Arugula Salad with Roasted Tomatoes, Chickpeas and Feta – substitute whole grape tomatoes if you can’t/won’t slice the Roma tomatoes

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NoBull Veggie Burgers – or substitute patty of your choice, serve on store-bought buns with baby carrots and hummus, or baked-from-frozen sweet potato or zucchini fries

Vegology Vegetarian Gumbo with Brown Rice – all ingredients can be purchased pre-chopped, frozen, or canned

Real Simple Stuffed Poblano Peppers – instead of stuffing, I chopped the roasted poblanos in a food processor and added them to the rice mixture

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AllRecipes.com Unsloppy Joes – all ingredients can be purchased pre-chopped, frozen, or canned

Budget Bytes Quick Fix Salad Bar Pizza – the salad bar is definitely your friend for finding pre-chopped ingredients. Substitute a store-bought pizza crust for tortilla if you want a thicker, breadier crust.

Sweets too! Baked doughnuts are a really easy dessert and I was pleasantly surprised to find that I could make these with just one hand.

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Joy the Baker’s Double Chocolate Cake Doughnuts

Vegology Supercharged Coffee Doughnuts

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Thank you to those readers who have patiently forgiven my three month hibernation and are still around for this revival of Vegology! I am thrilled to have found a way to keep writing and I am excited to rejoin the amazing blogging community after some time off. I hope you are excited too!

Moroccan Kamut Salad

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I was recently perusing the grains at the grocery store and came across one that I had never seen before: KAMUT®. It looked like wheat berries, which I love, and it came in pretty packaging, an attribute for which I will eternally be a sucker, so I tossed it in my basket to try at home after a little Internet research. The brand I bought was Bob’s Red Mill Grains of Discovery series.

Ancient grains are supposedly hot this year (who decides these things?), so I have completely bought into whatever marketing scheme placed the attractive bag of wheat on the shelf and subsequently into my cart. . . then into my kitchen, onto my dinner table, and. . . within this blog post. Should I have named this post “Meta Kamut® Salad?”

I can guarantee you I am not being paid by the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Grains to write this post, so let’s learn something, shall we? First, KAMUT® is the trademarked name for a certain type of Khorasan wheat (turanicum variety Q-77). The exact origin of Khorasan wheat is unknown, but it is believed to have been originally cultivated in the Fertile Crescent. According to one legend, Khorasan wheat was once near extinction until an American airman mailed some seeds found in Egypt back home to his family in Montana in the late 1940’s to cultivate, thus reintroducing the grain to modern cuisine. It’s a nice story that I don’t think I believe, but it does make for good dinner conversation. If you are blessed with a table full of dinner guests who believe in dining without smart phones, you could really embellish this tale into a great story, without fear of someone fact-checking you halfway through the main course.

Khorasan wheat grains are roughly twice the size of the common wheat kernel which makes them very attractive in salads. They have a nutty flavor with a pleasant chew when cooked properly. They can also be milled into flour for use in baked goods. One clear advantage of Khorasan wheat over common modern wheat is that it has a much higher protein content; at seven grams per serving, it has up to 40% more protein than common wheat. Khorasan wheat also contains a higher percentage of selenium, zinc, magnesium, and amino acids. Full nutritional information is available on the Bob’s Red Mill website.

Would all of these spices marry up with this ancient grain, feta cheese, kale, carrots, and pomegranate arils anywhere in the world besides my kitchen? Who knows, but the combo tastes pretty awesome. This salad is tasty served warm or cold. Plus the salad is a nutritional powerhouse that would make for great make-ahead lunches that would leave you satisfied all afternoon.

I enjoyed the flavor and texture of the Khorasan wheat so I think I will use it again. However, this ingredient does require a little planning, as the wheat berries have to soak in water overnight. Not a quick go-to pantry ingredient, but one that is worth the wait if you plan meals better than I do most nights.

Moroccan Khorasan Wheat Salad (serves 4)

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Ingredients:

  • 1 cup KAMUT® brand Khorasan wheat berries
  • 3 cups low sodium vegetable stock
  • 4 threads saffron
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil, divided (2 + 1)
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 3 large carrots, sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 bunch of kale, coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 4 ounces crumbled feta
  • 1/2 cup pomegranate arils
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

  1. Cover wheat berries in water and soak overnight, or at least six hours.
  2. In a medium pot over medium heat, bring vegetable stock to a boil. Add saffron and wheat berries and simmer, covered, for 50-60 minutes or until tender.
  3. In a large pan, heat 2 Tbsp olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and carrots and saute until onion is translucent. Add spices (ginger through cayenne) and saute for 1-2 minutes, then remove from heat.
  4. Heat 1 Tbsp olive oil over medium heat in a large pot. Add garlic and kale and saute until wilted. Add lemon juice and turn heat to low.
  5. Add carrot-onion mixture and wheat berries to large pot with kale and cook until warmed throughout.
  6. To serve cold: remove from heat to refrigerator, chill this mixture for at least one hour, then add feta, pomegranate, and salt and pepper to taste.
  7. To serve warm: remove from heat, add feta, pomegranate, and salt and pepper to taste, then serve immediately.

Do your goal setting skills need a tune up?

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It’s a new year, and with new beginnings come resolutions and goals. The local gyms are packed with ambitious resolution-makers, home organization paraphernalia is on sale at Target, savings accounts start to grow again, and the grocery store is sold out of all my favorite health food. I think rebooting at the beginning of the year is a very positive thing, and I always take this time to set some goals for myself for the coming year.

However, we all know that resolutions and goals usually fade after a month or two. This is evident when I no longer have to wait in line for a cardio machine at the gym, or have to visit three grocery stores in order to find fresh kale. I don’t always follow through with my resolutions either, but I have learned a few things about setting and meeting goals, which I think may be helpful knowledge for you, especially at the beginning of a new year.

I recently learned a lot about goals while recovering from my bike accident last October. Almost immediately after being discharged from the hospital, I wanted to know when I could do my favorite things again. I actually tried to convince Kyle that I may be up for a hike later that week. Yes, both my arms were in casts, I likely had a few broken ribs, I was on a hefty dose of painkillers, and I had two surgeries on the horizon. When it all sunk in, I realized that I would not be able to live an active lifestyle that week, or for the next several weeks, until I had met some recovery goals.

I have always been a very goal-oriented and determined person, so I visualized the things I wanted to be able to do after recovering from my injuries, and I focused on those things to get me through the first few weeks. Cooking a meal unassisted was at the top of that list. I couldn’t even hold a fork for the first few days, and my family had to take turns making my food, feeding me, and doing self-care tasks like brushing my teeth. Because I am a very independent person, this was pretty tough for me to handle. I was pretty helpless, and a home cooked meal felt very far away.

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I started physical therapy one week after my surgeries, and the therapist asked me what hobbies, aside from daily activities and work, I wanted to be able to do after recovery. Yoga and riding a bicycle were right below cooking on that list. The slightest touch to my wrist sent pain shooting up and down my arm, but I wanted to be able to hold a downward dog when this was all over.

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For a week or two, these goals gave me hope and inspired me to work hard on the simple therapy homework I was given. Then these ambitious goals made me frustrated. I spent a lot of time thinking about how long it would take for me to achieve them, and it made my situation feel hopeless. When I expressed this to one of my good friends, she told me that I should simply make smaller goals for progress, instead of getting hung up on the big goals that were so far away.

This immediately made a lot of sense to me. After all, I didn’t run a half marathon earlier that year by setting out to run 13.1 miles in the first week. For three weeks, the longest distance I ever ran was 3 or 4 miles. I knew I would get to 13.1 eventually, but I set a goal for each run in my training plan and I focused only on that accomplishment for the day.

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For me, the first few mini-goals were things that most people with two functioning arms would take for granted. Brush my own teeth. Take a shower without help. Pick up a cup of coffee and drink it. I dropped the toothbrush, spilled the coffee, and took a 90 minute shower the first time I met each of these goals, but I achieved them nonetheless, and celebrating my progress made me feel that I was one step closer to that downward facing dog.

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Six weeks after the accident, I was cleared for limited cardio, and only on the stationary bike. My doctor was worried I might fall doing anything else, including using the treadmill. It was a big moment when I jumped back in the saddle and started to pedal, and an even bigger one when I successfully completed 30 minutes on the bike. I re-entered society soon after, showing up to classes at Boho Cycle Studio here in Richmond and feeling inspired by the tough workouts and energetic, hyper-motivational instructors.

Another mini-goal was being able to chop vegetables, and although I did not have full range of motion or much strength at all yet, I chopped a head of cauliflower in week 7. You can see in the picture below that the form is horrible, as I couldn’t fully grip things yet, but being able to finally contribute to dinner preparation again meant a lot to me. In the same week, I was cleared to drive a little too, which gave me a great sense of independence and a boost to my self-esteem.

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I had an ambitious goal in mind around mid-November, and that was to help prepare some of Christmas dinner. I ended up helping out a lot in the kitchen on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. I had not completely achieved my goal of cooking on my own yet, but this felt like a big step in the right direction.

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And now I am thrilled to announce that after nine weeks since my surgery, I have finally prepared a dinner by myself, start to finish, with no assistance from my husband or anyone else. This weekend, I made a Mediterranean-inspired spinach and artichoke pasta dish and it was really good! Simple, but good! Progress!

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Goals are achieved one day at a time. When you have really big goals and dreams, it is good to keep them in mind for motivation, but sometimes it can get overwhelming and frustrating to think about the long road ahead. If you struggle with this like I do, you should set smaller milestones for yourself, and celebrate progress along the way.

If your goal is to lose weight this year, make a promise to yourself that today you will spend 30 minutes at the gym, or today you will pack a healthy lunch for work tomorrow. After a week of good days, reward yourself with a fresh juice and celebrate your progress. If you are setting out to be more organized, don’t bury yourself under a pile of home organization systems and tackle the whole house at once. Instead, set a goal for today to organize just the bills, or just the kitchen utensil drawer, or to pick up and put away twenty things before you go to bed.

With a long-term plan in place, and a series of small goals accomplished day by day, you will eventually reach your big goals at the end of the road, and be much happier and motivated along the way. Good luck, and happy 2014!

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Spinach & Artichoke Pesto Pasta

4-6 servings

Ingredients:

  • 16 oz. fresh or dried pasta (I used Bombolini pasta shells)
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 14 oz. can of quartered artichoke hearts, drained
  • 1/2 cup pitted kalamata olives, halved
  • 1 large tomato, diced
  • 10 oz. package frozen spinach, thawed and drained
  • 1/4 cup basil pesto (my favorite recipe here)
  • 1/4 tsp lemon pepper seasoning
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • extra virgin olive oil to taste
  • 2 oz. feta cheese, crumbled

Preparation:

  1. Cook pasta according to package directions and drain.
  2. Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat.
  3. Add garlic to pan and saute 1-2 minutes.
  4. Add artichoke hearts and olives to pan. Saute for 3 minutes or until warm.
  5. Add tomato, spinach, and pesto to pan and cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes. If spinach and tomato are dry, add a half cup of water to pan.
  6. Add cooked pasta to the pan and season with lemon pepper, salt, and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until warmed.
  7. Top with a drizzle of olive oil if needed and serve with crumbled feta on top.

Give a Gift That Keeps Giving: Shop for Charity this Holiday Season

A few years ago, Kyle and I started a pretty cool holiday tradition. While attending college full-time and working part-time, we were both on a tight budget. Like many couples, we set a spending limit on our Christmas gifts to each other so our wallets wouldn’t be stretched too thin. I first wrote about how we budget for the holidays in this post from last year. The most meaningful part of this tradition for me was that a portion of our spending limit has always been allocated to charitable donations. Every year, we each make a donation in the other’s name to a charity that is important to us. It is really important to me that even while we had very little to give, we maintained the practice of donating to organizations that worked to help those who were less fortunate than us.

I have noticed a trend over the last few years of gifts connected to charitable causes. This allows you to give an actual material gift to the special person on your list, and also support a charity whose mission you believe in. You may have seen Product (RED) items in various retailers, or you may be familiar with companies like TOMS that use a portion of the proceeds from product sales to fund charitable work. Last year, Kyle and I honeymooned in Colorado and while there, we picked up a bunch of soup kits from the Women’s Bean Project to give to family and friends for Christmas.

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The soup kits are made  by women in Denver, CO who are chronically unemployed, and the proceeds from the sale of these products go to support programs that help women develop the skills they need to get and keep a job. WBP2

Of course we picked up a few mixes for ourselves too, and I can attest to their deliciousness. If you would like to try them, you don’t have to fly to Denver like we did. You can order these and other gifts online at the Women’s Bean Project store. If soup, dip, and baking mixes and gourmet foods aren’t your thing, or if you’re shopping for a loved one whose interests lie outside of cooking, here are some other ideas for gifts that keep giving this holiday season.

BeadforLife is a Fair Trade Federation organization that helps Ugandan women sell their handmade jewelry to earn a living wage. Their online store features beaded jewelry, loose beads, shea butter body products and more.

GreaterGood.org is a website that compiles product listings that benefit multiple organizations. I love that this site allows you to Shop by Cause, so that you can choose to shop from the Hunger Site to fight world hunger, the Animal Rescue Site to fund food and care for rescued animals, the Breast Cancer Site to fund mammograms for women in need, the Rainforest Site to protect endangered habitats, or purchase from other stores that benefit causes including Veterans, Autism, Diabetes, or Literacy.

You are probably already familiar with TOMS shoes, which donates one pair of shoes to a person in need for every pair you buy. Did you know that TOMS also has an Eyewear division that provides prescription glasses to U.S. middle school students in need? Shop for really cute sunglasses at the TOMS online store to support this cause.

The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society has teamed up with Lands’ End this year to produce hundreds of items in their online store for which Lands’ End will donate 20% of revenue to LLS. Items can be personalized with logos and monograms, as well as the LLS “Someday is Today” logo if you would like.

The ASPCA online store has a ton of great gifts for pets and pet-lovers, with or without the ASPCA logo. Some of my favorites include the DJ Cat Scratching Pad  (<- it is so worth it to click that link) and the Anti-Puppy Mills Tote.

The International Princess Project is an organization that provides much-needed resources to women and girls escaping sex slavery in India. The women are rehabilitated in sewing centers, where they produce clothing for sale in countries around the world and work to achieve lives of hope and dignity. Punjammies is a fun line of loungewear produced by the women in IPP sewing centers to fund their programs.

Shop the Product (RED) store to fund HIV/AIDS programs in Africa. Partner brands agree to donate 50% of revenue for these items to The Global Fund, and 100% of the money raised by The Global Fund goes to fighting AIDS in Africa, with the goal of eradicating the disease.

To see more ideas and links to sites that make giving back easy, check out my Pinterest board, Gifts That Give Back!

Warm Up With a Homemade Gingerbread Tea Latte

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Is there any part of the country that isn’t  having a cold spell right now? The frigid weather in Richmond (among other things) is keeping me from leaving my warm toasty house today. I absolutely have to share with you this delicious beverage that I concocted to stay warm this weekend, as well as an ingenious method I discovered for frothing milk without a fancy machine! This recipe and method are so easy that even a one handed blogger on pain medication (I) can do it!

If you follow me on Instagram or Twitter, you may have picked up on a post from about a month ago in which I announced I had had a bike accident while on vacation in Asheville, North Carolina.

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I spent the night in the hospital for observation due to the head trauma, had the bones set back in place, had my bumps, bruises, and road rash cleaned up, and then I was released the next morning. We cut the vacation short, returned to Richmond, and about a week later, I had surgery to have plates inserted in my left wrist and right hand. I have been recovering ever since, and both hands have been pretty useless for five weeks, which is why the blog has been quiet since October. Now that I am starting to use the computer again, and I was able to convince my husband Kyle to type for me, I am finally able to post an update!

Thanks to everyone who tweeted and commented messages of support and positivity while I have been recovering from the accident and surgery. Thanks also to Kyle for helping me out with this post, not to mention ALL the other things he has had to help me out with since the big fall. I can’t wait to reschedule our Asheville 1-year anniversary trip once I’m healed (and out of medical bill debt. . .) so we can go back and do all the things we missed out on the first time.

Now. . . on to my super simple Tea Latte recipe! The recipe calls for five ingredients that you probably already have in your kitchen.

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My Gingerbread Tea Latte features Celestial Seasonings Gingerbread Spice tea, but you could use any tea you have on hand to make your own version. The other four ingredients are: milk, pure vanilla extract, ground cinnamon, and agave syrup (you may substitute the sweetener of your choice).

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I found the milk frothing method online at theKitchn.com and I couldn’t believe it worked until I tried it myself. The yield and quality of foam is less than what you get from a steam wand on a commercial grade espresso machine, but for making one or two drinks at home, it certainly does the trick.

  • First, you pour your cold milk into a glass jar and secure the lid. Make sure you use a jar large enough that the milk fills the jar no more than halfway.
  • Second, shake the jar as hard as you can for about 30 seconds.
  • Third, remove the lid (if metal) and replace with plastic wrap or a microwave-safe material.
  • Fourth, microwave the milk until hot to stabilize the foam and heat up the liquid for serving.
  • Last, pour into your drink, holding back the foam with a spoon, and then scooping the foam on top of the beverage.

I was very impressed with the results!

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The foam held up for at least twenty minutes while I photographed and then sipped the drink. Four ounces of milk yielded two to three ounces of foam, which was a great proportion for my latte.

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The foam even held up pretty well after I topped it with cinnamon (which almost always eats away at the volume of bubbly froth at the top of a beverage). I hope you enjoy this delicious drink that tastes like fresh baked gingerbread in a fraction of the time (and for a fraction of the calories!).

Gingerbread Tea Latte

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Serves 1

Ingredients:

  • 1 bag Celestial Seasonings Gingerbread Spice herbal tea
  • 2 teaspoons agave syrup (or equivalent sweetener of your choice)
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup 1% milk (or the milk of your choice)
  • dash of ground cinnamon

Preparation:

  1. Heat water in a tea kettle. Add 1/2 cup hot water to a mug with the tea bag. Steep for 4 minutes, then remove tea bag.
  2. While tea is steeping, froth the milk. Add cold milk to a jar and shake vigorously, with lid on, for 30 seconds. Replace lid with microwave safe lid or plastic wrap and microwave for 45 seconds on high.
  3. To the tea concentrate, add agave (or sweetener), and vanilla, and stir.
  4. Using the back of a spoon to hold back the foam, carefully pour the milk into the tea concentrate, then use the spoon to scoop the milk foam on top of the drink.
  5. Top with a dash of cinnamon and drink while hot.

Enjoy, and stay warm!

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The Walking Dead Season Premiere Dinner

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The fourth season of “The Walking Dead” premieres this weekend and I have been dying to put together a celebration meal to kick off the new season. When Kyle and I did our first Richmond Zombie Walk in 2007, we noticed that a few of the zombies were eating “blood”-stained heads of cauliflower while lumbering down Cary Street. I have not forgotten what a great stand-in the cauliflower was for a human brain, so I knew I wanted to use that as  main element of my dinner. We ate this meal a night ahead of time, because we weren’t sure if we would be able to stomach the beet juice stained cauliflower while watching the very graphic show. I have a lot of respect for anyone who tries! Here are three great recipes inspired by AMC’s “The Walking Dead” for your own gory premiere celebration or spooky Halloween dinner.

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We started off with a mock-tail that reminded us of the setting of the show. For a spiked version, I recommend adding sweet tea flavored vodka to the mix. But go easy on the sweet tea vodka, *I heard from a friend* that it is delicious and can be very dangerous!

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The base of the drink is peach flavored iced tea, which is reminiscent of the series’ Georgia setting. I combined the iced tea with sweetened blood orange juice and soda to give it a bloody twist.

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This Martinelli’s blood orange juice comes sweetened and it was all I could find at the grocery stores in Richmond this week. If you have better luck than me finding it, you could use fresh blood orange juice and sweeten to taste if you prefer to control the sugar content.

Iced Blood Orange Georgia Peach Sweet Tea

recipe for 1 pitcher – serves 4-6

Ingredients:

  • 4 bags Celestial Seasonings Country Peach Passion herbal tea
  • 1-1/2 cups sparking water
  • 1 cup sweetened blood orange juice
  • Ice
  • Optional: 1/2 cup sweet tea or peach flavored vodka

Preparation:

  1. Boil 2 cups water. Pour hot water over tea bags in large pitcher. Let steep 4 minutes, then remove tea bags.
  2. Transfer pitcher to refrigerator to cool.
  3. When cooled, add sparkling water and blood orange juice to pitcher. Optional: add vodka. Stir to combine.
  4. Serve over ice.

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Last season of “The Walking Dead” left us with summer turning to fall. Our next two dishes teamed up to serve us a combination of the sultry, smoky flavor of Southern summer turning to fall, and the raw blood and guts that zombie flick fans have come to love. Here are the final two recipes, that taste great on their own but also go really well together. Scroll the past recipes for a throwback photo and my best zombie joke.

Spicy Roasted Cauliflower “Brains” with Citrusy Beet Salad

Ingredients:

  • 3 beets, greens removed
  • 1 head cauliflower
  • 4 Tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon liquid aminos (or soy sauce)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 orange
  • 1/4 cup parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Wash the beets and slice off the tops. Lay beets cut side down in a glass baking dish. Add a few tablespoons of water to the dish and cover with aluminum foil. Roast beets in preheated oven at 400 degrees F for 50-60 minutes or until tender. Remove cover and let cool.
  3. Meanwhile, grate the orange to get about a tablespoon of orange zest. Then slice into segments and dice the orange, discarding the peel.
  4. Once beets are cooled, remove the skins. The rough skins should slide right off. Set beets aside. Reserve the cooking water in the bottom of the pan.
  5. Trim  the leaves off the cauliflower and place on a cutting board stem side down. Slice the cauliflower into 1-inch slices, cutting from top to stem, working right to left. You should have several cross-sections in which you can see the branches. (See my post on Cauliflower Steaks for a visual)
  6. Spread the sliced cauliflower in a single layer on a baking sheet.
  7. In a small bowl, combine 2-3 tablespoons of the beet juice from the baking dish, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, liquid aminos, cumin, smoked paprika, 1/2 teaspoon of orange zest, and 1/2 teaspoon salt.
  8. Brush the cauliflower slices with the beet juice mixture. Roast the cauliflower slices at 400 degrees F for 30 minutes, turning halfway through cooking.
  9. While the cauliflower cooks, dice the cooled beets into small cubes. Toss with diced orange in a medium sized bowl. Add the remaining orange zest, parsley, balsamic vinegar, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, and a dash of cumin and stir to combine. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  10. Serve cauliflower slices topped with beet salad for a gory beet blood stained meal!

Smoky Chipotle Butternut Squash and Butter Beans with Adobo Brown Butter Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter (I told you this was Southern. . .)
  • 1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cubed
  • 1 chipotle in adobo sauce, finely chopped
  • 1 can butter beans, drained and rinsed

Preparation:

  1. Heat butter in large pan over medium heat until browned and foamy.
  2. Add the squash to the pan and toss in butter to coat.
  3. Add the chopped chipotle in adobo sauce and cook over medium heat, stirring often, for about 10 minutes or until squash begins to brown.
  4. Cover and reduce heat to low. Cook an additional 10 minutes over low heat.
  5. Add butter beans to pan and cover. Cook 5-10 minutes more or until squash is tender.
zombie1

What do vegetarian zombies eat? GRAAAAIIIINS!!!